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20100701
20100731
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STATION
WRC (NBC) 9
WBAL (NBC) 7
KNTV (NBC) 3
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English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
NBC
Jul 26, 2010 3:05am EDT
quote resident. >> i had hank in u.s. history. he knew a lot of people. he was comfortable with a lot of different groups. >> reporter: the alpha male, seth cravens? well, he loved playing football, but not for nothing was his nickname "moose knuckle". >> seth was physically imposing but as a football player didn't have that ability to just plug into what his responsibilities were. >> reporter: maybe because the team he seemed to care most about was the bird rock bandits. he was sort of a ring leader of that group? >> he was a bit o a leader. the others, with the exception of hank, were a bit more of a follower type. and rather easily led maybe. >> reporter: la jolla high sends 90% of its student office to college. an exceptional number. but out of the five bird rock bandits hendricks made the football team at the university of new hampshire and the rest
NBC
Jul 18, 2010 7:00pm EDT
to take us along with his seven kids, u.s. citizens all, on their journey to work in the fields. they piled high into their creeky van and pointed it north toward ohio. as we got to know pablo, we realized that he saw a purity to his work where we'd seen just back-breaking stooped labor. >> translator: i think the migrant worker is the happiest man in the world. >> this was a test for even pablo's sunny disposition. breakdowns. on-the-fly road repairs. even his van catching fire. back then, we watched the kids down uncooked hot dogs as they drove to the next field for picking. our american hearts, a bounty put on our table over the years by little guys like james flores, 11 years old and already a seasoned farmhand. >> this bone hurts a lot. >> the spine bone hurts? >> yeah. >> but back in 1998, james worked through his aching back picking cucumbers. bent over in a field when he should have been in summer school. all so his family would have extra hands to fill the farmers' buckets. we wondered if the link of childhood was being taken away from him and oth
NBC
Jul 11, 2010 7:00pm EDT
, policymaking circles of the u.s. now in spy charge agents like that are called illegals because for the most part they're not working under their real names and don't have the traditional spy game cover of a diplomatic posting. >> illegals are the worst kind of spy, hardest to spot, hardest to catch, and the most insidious because you don't know what they're doing, you don't know where they're going. >> eric o'neill was an undercover fbi operative for five years. he was key in bringing down the notorious fbi spy robert hanson. an unanswered question is how the government got on to the spies here in first place. o'neill has three theories. >> the first, of course, is source information from overseas. the other way, it could be just good old-fashioned surveillance work. the third way, of course, is one of these illegals could have sold out, could have decided i like the life in america. >> whether there is an illegal who sold out the others, we don't know. but what's certain is that none of the russians seemed aware that the fbi had been bugging their homes, reading their computers, and survei
NBC
Jul 12, 2010 3:05am EDT
stanley mcchrystal, the commander of u.s. forces there was fired. there were increasing questions about the military's counterinsurgency strategy. and no criticism of the karzai administration. but nothing brings home the pain and complexity of afghanistan more than stories of our soldiers who are fighting there. for one platoon, a bloody battle in a remote eastern valley took a terrible toll. now, the families of the soldiers who died there have taken on an emotional mission of their own to find out what really happened and who should be held accountable. here's nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engel. >> when you send your son off to war, you expect that they will get everything that this great country can provide to protect them. >> this situation was pure reckless. you just have to say this is wrong. >> bad things happen, but our boys are not cannon fodder. the united states has to protect these men. in this case, it was not done. >> reporter: every parent who sends a son or daughter to war knows the worst can happen. but that deep, often unspoken, fear is tempered by a fait
NBC
Jul 23, 2010 9:00pm PDT
in newfoundland were complete. he had returned to the u.s. and had discovered a passion for family practice where his love for people and theirs for him seemed as natural, as comfortable as the quiet town in pennsylvania in which he had chosen to live. and then november, 2001, andrew bagby was shot dead in a state park not far from the hospital in which the young doctor was a resident. and his devoted parents all but lost the will to live. after you found out about andrew's death the impulse to just end it, you were done? >> yeah. >> what stopped you? >> i think it was a rage at the person who did this. i've got to go to the trial and see what happens to the bastard who did this. >> reporter: the rage was tempered with a yearning to know just why andrew had been assassinated. andrew of all people seemed to have no enemies at all. the only thing about his life that didn't make sense to some friends and family was his relationship with that doctor from newfoundland, the one he'd started dating when going to medical school there. >> she just kind of appeared and then she was there all the time all o
NBC
Jul 19, 2010 10:00pm PDT
think it would be good. >> researchers hope to get the drug approve d. >>> the u.s. senate will likely vote to extend federal unemployment benefits. but as tom sinkovitz reports, nor a -- >> reporter: president obama wanted to put three faces on the unemployed, middle-class americans and said they shouldn't be used as hostages y by. >> the same people who didn't have any problem spending hundreds of billions of dollars on tax breaks are now and really need help. >> reporter: they've needed help since may when benefits expired for 2.5 million americans. that number clues 268,000 americans. and won't be helped by an extension. and there are few signs of an improving job market. for example, since it began two years ago, about 43,000 san francisco of courses are they need assistance. >> they're not looking for a handout. they desperately want to work. justite right now they can't find a rob -- >> we must live within our own means. we cannot spend what we don't have. >> well, tomorrow the democrats will have the chance to fight opposition. he
NBC
Jul 12, 2010 10:00pm EDT
into his background. he'd grown up in louisiana, served three years in the u.s. navy. as this home video shows, he'd become a family man. another home movie showed he was the kind of guy who'd hook a camera up to the tv to admire himself. >> he puts the music on, takes his shirt off, flexes his chest muscles and his arm muscles, watching himself the entire time. and that's tyrone delgado. >> reporter: and agents learned delgado was trained in martial arts. >> he's very proud of how high he can kick and how strong he can kick. >> reporter: when you see that you got to think of melissa mooney's door. >> absolutely. it's not easy to kick in a door. >> reporter: but it was when they checked delgado's criminal record that investigators realized they'd missed something in the early days of the investigation. you'd already canvassed the neighborhood. >> uh-huh. >> reporter: run everybody's criminal record? >> did not run everybody's criminal record. we interviewed hundreds of people. in retrospect, that probably would've been a good thing to do. >> reporter: had they run delgado's criminal reco
NBC
Jul 4, 2010 7:00pm EDT
swan." hank even grew close to doug flutey, the heisman trophy winner and resident. >> i had hank in u.s. history. he knew a lot of people and i think he was comfortable with a lot of different groups. >> and the alpha male, seth cravens? well, he loved playing football. but the not for nothing was his nickname, moose knuckle. >> seth was physically imposing, but as a football player didn't have that ability to just plug into what his responsibilities were. >> maybe because the team he seemed to care most about was the birdrock bandits. >> he was sort of a ring leader of that group. >> he was a bit of a leader. i think the others, with the exception of hank, were a bit more of a follower type. and rather easily led, maybe. >> la jolla high sends 90% of its students off to college, an exceptional number. but among the five birdrock bandits, hank hendricks made the football team at the university of new hampshire. and the rest? slouched out of their teens in full grist, living with parents, dabbling in community colleges, working odd jobs, going apparently nowhere. >> they never got out of
NBC
Jul 9, 2010 9:00pm EDT
attorneys say they will take this case all the way to the u.s. supreme court. if you want more information about this cas to our website at dateline.msnbc.com. that's all for this "dateline friday." we'll be back sunday7:00, 6:00 central. i'm ann
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)